Posted 3 days ago
It is fearful to know that at this moment we bear the responsibility for the next, that every decision from the smallest to the largest is a decision for all eternity, that at every moment we bring to reality—or miss—a possibility that exists only for the particular moment. Every moment holds thousands of possibilities, but we can choose only a single one of these; all the others we have condemned, damned to never-being—and that too, for all eternity. But it is glorious to know that the future, our own and therewith the future of the things and people around us, is dependent—even if only to a tiny extent—upon our decision at any given moment. What we actualize by that decision, what we thereby bring into the world, is saved; we have conferred reality upon it and preserved it from passing.
Victor E. Frankl, MD
Posted 3 days ago
Posted 3 days ago

nevver:

James Victore’s Top Type Rules

Rule that apply to more than just type.

Posted 3 days ago
Posted 2 months ago

The Mathematics of Murder: Should a Robot Sacrifice Your Life to Save Two?

We see the inevitability of the Skynet hive mind deciding to kill us, yet it is still a good thing?

Posted 2 months ago
Posted 6 months ago
The voluntary road away from the gratification cycles of addiction seems to involve the human frontal cortex, the processes of valuing and choosing and deciding. Models for effective and lasting change may have more to do with processes colloquially described as “making up one’s mind” than with counterconditioning and skill training. I do not discount the demonstrated value of behavioral approaches, which are modeled to some extent after allopathic medicine. I do puzzle, however, about what really constitutes motivation for change and what finally sets in motion the process of altering that which has been so persistent.

William R. Miller

Addictive Behaviors, 1996: 21(6). p. 842.

Posted 8 months ago

Wild mushroom skillet. Good morning! (at Hammond Bay)

Posted 9 months ago
Posted 9 months ago